CC + tutorial: Central Europe in the High and Later Middle Ages

Term: 
Winter
Credits: 
2.0
Course Description: 

This course provides an overview of the political and economic history of medieval Central Europe, concentrating on the territories that belonged (often with changing boundaries) to the kingdoms of Poland, Bohemia and Hungary-Croatia from the mid-thirteenth till the early sixteenth century. It will discuss issues such as the conceptual framework of the region, the expansion of the church network and religious orders, the foundation and development of cities and towns, the changing faces of the economy and the rise and fall of local and regional dynasties. Through these topics, the course intends to introduce the students to the most important methods and literature of the political, ecclesiastic, social and economic history of high and late medieval Central Europe. It presents a general overview of the main paradigms of study and familiarizes the students with new research questions. The tutorial will engage with current historiographical debates on Central Europe and offer an in-depth discussion of selected primary source materials on which the results are based.

NOTE: It is a core class which can go with or without the tutorial. Core class (lecture) = 2 credits; Core class + tutorial = 4 credits. The tutorial cannot be taken without the lecture.

Learning Outcomes: 

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • acquire a general knowledge of the history of Central Europe in the discussed period
  • gain familiarity with the most important interpretations and debates in the historiography, and the knowledge of selected items of recent scholarly literature
  • draw upon this general knowledge and various interpretations as a context and comparative perspective
  • place their specific research topics and results in this frame of reference.

Assessment: 

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
acquire a general knowledge of the history of Central Europe in the discussed period
gain familiarity with the most important interpretations and debates in the historiography, and the knowledge of selected items of recent scholarly literature
draw upon this general knowledge and various interpretations as a context and comparative perspective
place their specific research topics and results in this frame of reference.

Assignments for the Tutorial

  • Class journals: 2-3 page essays based on the presentation and analysis of a source or an artefact connected to the main theme of the preceding two weeks placed in the context of class readings, to be submitted every second week. (6 journals, 15 % each).
  • Class participation and contribution to the discussions (10 %)

Prerequisites: 

open to all