Courses

At the beginning of the twenty-first century the uses of thehuman body, its organs, tissues and cells are increasingly diversified. One can observe the worldwide presence of old uses and misuses of the human body, such as prostitution, organ trafficking, human trafficking but more and more also new forms of...
Instructor: Judit Sandor
Credits: 4.0
The Consultation course is mandatory for the one-year MA students and for the two-year MA first year students and optional for first year PhD students.The Academic Field Trip’s credits apply to the preparation for the annual academic field trip to important archaeological and cultural monuments in the region of...
Credits: 2.0
This course is meant to equip all students enrolled at the Medieval Studies Department with a basic knowledge of Latin as a “technical language” still used today in academic environments. To this purpose, the course will provide an overview of several types of source publications and secondary literature from various...
Credits: 0.0
The historian of Central and Eastern Europe frequently meets with secondary literature in the German language. Understanding of these texts needs more than practical conversation skills, as historical expression is a compound discourse created from elements derived from the literary, philosophical, legal, civic,...
Instructor: Carsten L. Wilke
Credits: 2.0
The aim of this course is to introduce students to a variety of sources and styles of Hungarian historiography that they can encounter in their own research. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to study primary sources as well as become more familiar with digital and online databases and source editions...
Instructor: Gabor Szegedi
Credits: 2.0
This course aims to offer perspectives on some key and debatable problems in historiography of medieval and imperial Russia, attacking our subjects from a non-ideological, comparative and preferably multidisciplinary angle.More specifically, this course aims:- to analyze comparatively and from the longue durée...
Instructor: Mikhail V. Dmitriev
Credits: 2.0
Historical thought in non-European traditions is not only of relevance to scholars of non-European history. However, without the relevant language competence, major works of non-European traditions remain inaccessible. This class engages with the rich tradition of Arab historiography and with primary sources and...
Instructor: Nadia Al-Bagdadi
Credits: 2.0
The aim of this course is to provide students familiarity with a select set of textual and archival sources related to early modern Ottoman history. More specifically, the course has a focus on the period of 1580-1700, which many scholars today consider the beginning of a long era of “crisis and transformation” in the...
Instructor: Gunhan Borekci
Credits: 2.0
This course will consider the origins and development of the theory that the universe was composed of indivisible bodies known as “atoms”. Atomism would, of course, go on to have a long and illustrious afterlife, but in the ancient world it faced strong opposition by the continuum theories of Aristotle and Galen, and...
Instructor: Georgina White
Credits: 2.0
The Vera and Donald Blinken Open Society Archives (www.osaarchivum.org), one of the most significant Cold War and human rights archives in the world, offers a three-credit interdisciplinary course to the students of the Human Rights Program of the Legal Studies Department. The course includes an introduction to the...
Credits: 3.0
The title of this course is borrowed from Moshe Idel's book published by CEU Press which treats magical ideas and practices in Jewish mysticism aiming at the deification of man, similar to Elijah's ascension or Enoch's translation in the Bible. The ambition to follow their example or to achieve something similar has...
Instructor: Gyorgy E. Szonyi
Credits: 2.0
The course is intended to be a supplement to the one on the Age of Justinian for those who are able to read the Greek sources in the original. Yet, it is also open to students who want to practice their Greek reading skills and are not taking the thematic course. During the term excerpts from some key sources from and...
Instructor: István Perczel
Credits: 2.0
In this seminar, we will read some of the early medieval (6th to 8th century) poems that formed (and form) the core of Christian religious chant in the Eastern Mediterranean. We will read some of the famous kontakia ascribed to Romanos Melodos; but also the Great Kanon of Andrew of Crete, poems of Sophronios of...
Instructor: Floris Bernard
Credits: 2.0
The course is intended to be a supplement to the one on the reception history of the Dionysian Corpus for those who are able to read the Greek sources in the original. Yet, it is also open to students who only want to practice their Greek reading skills and are not taking the thematic course. During the term, excerpts...
Instructor: István Perczel
Credits: 2.0
The present reading seminar will explore the formal conventions and contents of a specific genre, i.e., inscriptions produced in Classical and Postclassical Latin, ranging from Pompeian graffiti to early medieval inscriptions. In addition to reading and interpreting a selection of classical, late antique, and medieval...
Credits: 2.0
The overall goal of this course is to introduce students to the basic debates and methodologies of the digital humanities (DH), and to think through how these approaches and methods might best be applied in their respective projects and disciplines. We will first consider some of the best critical overviews and...
Credits: 2.0
Byzantium, as the legitimate heir of the Roman Empire, was regarded in the western (Latin) territories of Europe as the most important cultural and artistic center. Hated and envied, its brilliant fruits were among the most desirable products and the ambivalent feelings never stopped towards it. Politicians, diplomats...
Instructor: Béla Zsolt Szakács
Credits: 2.0
The Devil (Satan, Lucifer) , the supernatural personification of evil is a central figure in the history of Christianity. We will begin with examining the formation of this figure from New Testament times through Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. We will deal with the most spectacular public manifestation of...
Instructor: Gábor Klaniczay
Credits: 4.0
This course provides an overview of the political and economic history of medieval Central Europe, concentrating on the territories that belonged (often with changing boundaries) to the kingdoms of Poland, Bohemia and Hungary-Croatia from the mid-thirteenth till the early sixteenth century. It will discuss issues such...
Credits: 2.0
The course addresses the main issues in the development of Christianity in the first five centuries, starting as a small movement within Judaism in Palestine and developing over centuries and through various inner and outer conflicts into the dominant religion of the Mediterranean, identifying with the cause of her...
Credits: 2.0
4 credits = Core class + tutorial2 credits = Core class onlyThis course offers a topical survey of the so-called "General Crisis of the Seventeenth Century" as experienced concurrently in Europe and the Ottoman Empire from the late sixteenth century to the turn of the eighteenth century. Using both a lecture and...
Instructor: Gunhan Borekci
Credits: 4.0
This in an introductory course in the developing field of studies on communism and gender, in which we will explore historical, theoretical and global perspectives on the topic.Mainstream narratives about communism in Europe or China depict it as oppressive, gloomy, and a failure. In 1956 Soviet leader Joseph Stalin’s...
Instructor: Francisca de Haan
Credits: 4.0
The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with the aims, rationale, methods, and various cases of comparative studies in the social sciences and in historiography, with a focus on recent criticism of the comparative approach and the innovative “paradigms” proposed to overcome its shortcomings. In order to...
Credits: 2.0
“You are what you consume” has been the motto of ‘modern’ societies since the late 19th century. Besides being a key issue among broader economic and political processes, consumption is an important part of identity building. This class will examine 20th century capitalism and socialism through the lens of consumption...
Instructor: Oana Adelina Stefan
Credits: 2.0
Both Russians and Ottomans created multiethnic, multireligious and multicultural land empires, sovereign, but loosely bounded in overlapping borderlands. They emerged in European imaginary as friend or foe around the same time, and their identities were shaped to a large extent by complex interdependencies with the...
Credits: 4.0
The Core class can be taken with and without the tutorial. They both worth 2 credits.Recent developments in historical research reflect an increasing interest in the field of material culture. This interest has moved away from dealing with isolated and de-contextualized objects and artefacts used by people in the past...
Credits: 4.0
This course will discuss the relationships between texts and society in Byzantium. Primary focus is the way texts are used to shape social groups: monastic/devotional communities, intellectual/elite communities, families, and provincial communities. The concept of friendship as a driving force behind social networks...
Instructor: Floris Bernard
Credits: 4.0
This course is intended to assist first year PhD students in preparing for the comprehensive exam by surveying a major regional field. It deals with the vast space of Eastern and East-Central Europe that became the borderland of the Romanov, Habsburg and Hohenzollern empires after the collapse of the Polish-Lithuanian...
Instructor: Alexei Miller
Credits: 2.0
Since this is an advanced seminar, it will be tailored where possible to the specific research interests of the students, who will develop reading texts and presentation strategies in consultation with the instructors. Those whose primary research focus is not Eastern Europe may also introduce appropriate comparative...
Instructor: Alexei Miller
Credits: 2.0
The course will survey recent developments in “Eastern Christian Studies,” particularly as they pertain to the research on Greek-, Slavic-, and Armenian-speaking Christians in the Ottoman Empire between the 14th and 18th centuries. Studies on Christians in the Ottoman Empire have tended to completely disregard the...
Instructor: Tijana Krstić
Credits: 2.0
The course will address the mechanisms of imperial growth and patterns of imperial rule, with special focus on managing cultural, linguistic and religious diversity. We shall mechanisms of transfer from indirect to direct rule and vice versa, mechanisms of nationalization of imperial politics, strategies of...
Instructor: Alexei Miller
Credits: 4.0
Empires have been a prominent feature of world history: from the Assyrians to the Persians (Achaemenid), Athenians, Romans, Sasanians, and Chinese via the Byzantines, Umayyads, Abbasids and Mongols (not to mention the as yet ‘undiscovered’ empires of the Americas) to the Ottoman, Mughal, Spanish, Dutch, French, and...
Credits: 2.0
This course explores the history of labor from a global and transnational perspective. Lectures will highlight important debates that have emerged in the field of labor history, with an emphasis on the concepts and categories that have been interrogated and challenged in twenty-first century scholarship. There will be...
Instructor: Marsha Siefert
Credits: 4.0
This course explores the history of attempts to create a more durable and legitimate international order for 20th-century Europe – both after the two world wars and after the cold war. Placing them in a global context, and introducing classic and new perspectives of historical research, it focuses on different ...
Instructor: Patrick Cohrs
Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to introduce students to the methodological and theoretical approaches to cultural history and everyday life experience and apply these approaches to much larger social concerns like the study of empires and their aftermaths.  Until recently, the study of economic, “hard-data” tabulation-types...
Credits: 4.0
Plato in his Republic and Laws includes the theatre alongside the law courts and the assembly as the primary locus for political activity in classical Greek society. In doing so, he characterises the Athenian population as a government comprised of theatre-goers – a “theatocracy”. This course will examine how the...
Instructor: Georgina White
Credits: 2.0
The Faculty Research Seminar invites the departmental and CEU communities to share, learn about and discuss ongoing research. Presenters – visiting scholars, resident faculty, as well as advanced doctoral students or post-docs – are encouraged to offer work-in-progress (draft book chapters, articles, conference papers...
Credits: 1.0
This course is about the making of the global gender equality regime and the ways in which it shapes and is shaped by feminist activism in different world regions that are hierarchically positioned vis-à-vis each other. It covers the period starting with the UN International Women's Year in 1975 until the present day...
Instructor: Selin Çağatay
Credits: 2.0
On-going debates on the secular and the religious call for a rethinking of the historical, analytical and conceptual frames under which common concepts of these two were conceived. In particular, this rethinking has to integrate changing forms of religious expression and the globalization of religious movements. The...
Instructor: Nadia Al-Bagdadi
Credits: 2.0
This course aims to introduce students to issues that arise in discussions pertaining to state and religion, their connections, intersections, concordances and distinctions, following a discussion of why the issue of religion-state relations arises, and under what circumstances. The approach adopted is intended to...
Instructor: Aziz Al-Azmeh
Credits: 2.0
This exploration of modern Turkish history focuses on political history from the early twentieth century to the present with particular attention to the domestic, regional and international challenges facing the country. Following the foundation of the Turkish Republic in 1923, its leaders embarked on sweeping series...
Instructor: Brett Wilson
Credits: 4.0
We will attempt to explore how gender (“women’s policy”) was understood in different parts of the socialist bloc and in different phases of state socialism. In the Soviet Union the 1920s was an era of gender emancipation and experimentation with various family forms. The high Stalinism of the 1930s put an end to this...
Instructor: Eszter Bartha
Credits: 2.0
This course offers an introduction to a vast field of historical and sociological research at the intersection of gender, medicine, and science in the modern world. We explore the gendered nature of the three interrelated realms of medical and scientific knowledge production, practices, and technologies, together with...
Instructor: Emese Lafferton
Credits: 2.0
Both Russians and Ottomans created multiethnic, multireligious and multicultural land empires, sovereign, but loosely bounded in overlapping borderlands. They emerged in European imaginary as friend or foe around the same time, and their identities were shaped to a large extent by complex interdependencies with the...
Credits: 4.0
The aim of this course is to help you develop as a writer within the English speaking academic community by raising awareness of, practicing, and reflecting upon the conventions of written texts. In addition to addressing issues related to academic writing, the course will also focus on the other skills you will need...
Credits: 2.0
Starting in November we will begin to look at a range of issues connected with your thesis. The first two sessions in the Fall semester focus on (thesis) proposal writing.  First of all aiming to identify what it involves and looking at the requirements of writing an effective proposal. In the Winter semester we focus...
Credits: 2.0
Growing recognition of cross-disciplinary applicability and importance made Geographic Information Systems (GIS) a popular approach in historical studies. Until lately maps development and spatial analysis had been a prerogative of cartographers and, later, experts in specialized computer software (early GIS packages...
Instructor: Viktor Lagutov
Credits: 2.0
A filmmaking course for historians and those in related fields combining theoretical and practical components. The theoretical part of the course surveys classical and experimental documentary films and discusses the mechanisms of constructing and challenging established visual historical narratives. Introduction to...
Credits: 4.0
The seminar, as indicated in the title, complements the general course of historiography with a detailed discussion of all those historical debates, which related the general paradigms of European or world history to the specific problems of the historical region called East-Central Europe.  Conversely, there are also...
Credits: 2.0
This mandatory MA historiography seminar addresses the emergence and recent transformations of the Mediterranean as an historical object. The first part of the course will offer an overview of the historiography of the Mediterranean from Braudel to his most recent critics, and situate this historiography within the...
Instructor: Brett Wilson, Volker Menze
Credits: 2.0

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