Scholarly & Social Meetings: Professor Susan Zimmermann, "The Long-term Trajectory of Antislavery in International Politics. Early 19th to late 20th centuries."

Type: 
Lecture
Audience: 
CEU Community Only
Building: 
Nador u. 11
Room: 
Hanak Room
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 5:30pm
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Date: 
Tuesday, October 26, 2010 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

Program:

17:30 - 18:15: Presentation by Professor Susan Zimmermann, entitled "The Long-term Trajectory of Antislavery in International Politics. Early 19th to late 20th centuries."

You can find an abstract of the talk at the end of this message.

Place: Hanák Room (Nádor 11, 2nd floor)

18:15 - 18:50: Discussion

19:00 - open end: Drinks and informal meeting of students and faculty. Place: Spájz Kocsma (Lázár utca 7, see the link below).

The aim of the Scholarly-Social Meetings is to provide insights into the research undertaken at our department, and they also represent an opportunity to bring our students and faculty together in an effort to establish an academic community reaching beyond the day-to-day academic activities.

The meeting will begin with a presentation by Professor Susan Zimmermann, entitled "The Long-term Trajectory of Antislavery in International Politics. Early 19th to late 20th centuries.", followed by a discussion, and will continue with an informal socializing of students and faculty in Spájz Kocsma (in the VI. District, not far from CEU). We advise all students not to miss this opportunity to meet and talk with the speaker, faculty members, and fellow students.

Abstract:

Susan Zimmermann

The Long-term Trajectory of Antislavery in International Politics. Early 19th to late 20th centuries.

The presentation traces, from a long-term perspective, the involvement of international Antislavery-politics in processes of challenging, transforming, and deepening global inequality. It explores four major ‘threads’ characterizing the history of international Antislavery politics. The focus is on diplomacy among the European Powers, treaty-making with non-dominant communities, multilateral politics of colonial expansion, and Antislavery-politics in the context of decolonization and within the globalized “family of nations/international community” on the one hand, and on the politics of abolishing the transatlantic slave trade, as well as a larger variety of phenomena identified as slavery and components of the slave trade on the other. Each of the four ‘threads’ is shown to have contributed in a particular manner to the unfolding of major problem zones in international Antislavery-politics. It is argued that international Antislavery politics, because of a number of highly specific long-term characteristics of how it has been conceptualized on political and discursive levels, was involved in transformations of international politics which often can’t be described as emancipatory.