Scholarly & Social Meetings: Professor Thomas Lindenberger, "Societal Activism‘ and Communist Rule: The Case Study of Volunteer Police Assistants in East Germany (1952-1990)",

Type: 
Lecture
Audience: 
CEU Community Only
Building: 
Nador u. 11
Room: 
Hanak Room
Monday, November 15, 2010 - 5:30pm
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Date: 
Monday, November 15, 2010 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

We are pleased to invite you to the third History Department Scholarly & Social Meeting. Please note that the meeting will take place exceptionally next MONDAY, November 15th, in Hanák Room, starting at 17:30.

  Program:

17:30 - 18:15: Presentation by  professor Thomas Lindenberger, entitled " ‘Societal Activism‘ and Communist Rule: The Case Study of Volunteer Police Assistants in East Germany (1952-1990)."  You can find an abstract of the talk at the end of this message. Place: Hanák Room (Nádor 11, 2nd floor)

18:15 - 18:50: Discussion

19:00 - open end: Drinks and informal meeting of students and faculty.
Place: Spájz Kocsma (Lázár utca 7.)

The aim of the Scholarly-Social Meetings is to provide insights into the research undertaken at our department, and they also represent an opportunity to bring our students and faculty together in an effort to establish an academic community reaching beyond the day-to-day academic activities.

The meeting will begin with a presentation by professor Thomas Lindenberger, entitled " ‘Societal Activism‘ and Communist Rule: The Case Study of Volunteer Police Assistants in East Germany (1952-1990)", followed by a discussion, and will continue with an informal socializing of students and faculty in Spájz Kocsma (in the VI. District, not far from CEU). We remind that this is one of the last opportunities this semester to attend the meeting and familiarize yourself with the work and views of the speaker, the faculty and the fellow students.

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Abstract:
Thomas Lindenberger
‘Societal Activism‘ and Communist Rule: The Case Study of Volunteer Police Assistants in East Germany (1952-1990).

Everyday life under communism not only entailed omnipresent surveillance by the secret police and consequent repression of all forms of fundamental opposition, but also widespread forms of contributions of average citizen to the smooth functioning of the state. My presentation will discuss the example of regular policing in the German Democratic Republic, where about 120.000 “Freiwillige Helfer der Volkspolizei” (Voluntary Assistants of the People’s Police) were engaged during their free time in activities such as walking beats, regulating traffic and maintaining public order thus supporting the local police department. What were the motives for assisting the police? Did the rule of the party state acutally profit from such engagement? To what extent did volunteering in a state-socialist dictatorship make a difference?